The History of “Personalized Learning” [...]

What is the history of "personalized learning"? (When did it change from being "individualized learning," for example?) According to Wikipedia, the term dates from the 1960s. But Google's Ngram Viewer shows it was in use prior to that. Was the bump in the 1970s due to the commercialization of early teaching machines? And similarly, was the increase in the late 1990s o...

 

“Personalization” versus “Individualization” [...]

What is the history of the term "personalization" particularly as it relates to education (and education technology)? See Google's Ngram Viewer: The OED dates the word "personalization" in print to the 1860s, but the particular definition that's used today "The action of making something personal, or focused on or concerned with a certain individual or individuals; e...

 

Community Technology Centers’ Network [...]

From the Wikipedia entry for Antonia Stone: Antonia "Toni" Stone (1930-2002) created the United States' first community technology centers. In 1980, Toni Stone set up Playing to Win (PTW). Playing to Win, a nonprofit organization dedicated to countering inequities in computer access. PTW looked to serve inmates and ex-offenders by teaching them computer skills and off...

 

Literature and History and the Flynn Effect [...]

James Flynn of fame thinks gains in IQ are going to waste. In other words, our IQs may have risen, but this hasn’t made us any wiser. “Reading literature and reading history is the only thing that’s going to capitalise on the IQ gains of the 20th Century and make them politically relevant.” You may or may not agree, but Flynn is not the only person with this ...

 

Disciplines [...]

Most academic disciplines can trace their roots to the secularization of universities in the 18th and 19th centuries and, with the Enlightenment, the turn towards the sciences and a more orderly system of knowledge. From Michel Foucault's Surveiller et punir (translated into English, of course, as Discipline and Punish): “Discipline” may be identified neither with...

 

The Stanford Expropriation Effect [...]

Anything that can be labeled or marketed as an ed-tech "innovation" will be claimed by or linked to Stanford, even if that claim is 1) tenuous, 2) partial, or 3) historically inaccurate. Examples: MOOCs, computer-assisted instruction, the Open Syllabus Project...

 

Platforms in Education [...]

Investor Tom Vander Ark recently wrote on op-ed on LinkedIn, arguing that "platforms" were poised to transform education. It's actually an old argument, one reprised from 4 years ago when there was a lot of hype (and investment) in the very topic, most notably perhaps a sizable investment in Edmodo (a company that Vander Ark's VC firm has funded). Here's how Vander Ar...

 

Papert on Learning Theory [...]

From Seymour Papert's The Children's Machine: >Behaviorists are fond of using the designation "learning theory" for the foundations of their thinking, but what they are talking about is not "learning" in the sense of something a learner does but "instruction," in the sense of something the instructor does to the learner....

 

Constructionism versus Instructionism [...]

From Seymour Papert's The Children's Machine: >The word instructionism is intended to mean something rather different from pedagogy, or the art of teaching. It is to be read on a more ideological or programmatic level as expressing the belief that the route to better learning must be the improvement of instruction if School is less than perfect, why then, you know...

 

Papert on Teaching Computer Skills [...]

From Seymour Papert's The Children's Machine: >In the case of computer knowledge, [Paolo Freire's] banking approach is often defended by the argument that it will stand the students in good stead when they grow up and look for jobs that will require computer skills. Nothing could be more ridiculous. If "computer skills" is interpreted in a narrow sense of technical...